25.8 C
India

“If you cannot discover that creative moment, better to walk away”—Roger Federer explains why he needed to change training methods

Published:

Roger Federer feels that even the best sportsmen must constantly reinvent themselves and be “creative” as they progress in their careers. Federer advised “walking away” when an athlete lacks inventiveness.

However, the Swiss tennis legend also admitted that altering his training methods was essential to his long career.

The 20-time Grand Slam champion explained why sports GOATs retire. While he has always found it interesting to see how many great sportsmen pursue diverse pursuits post-retirement, he believes the major element that leads to retirement is “monotony.”

“It’s always extremely interesting to see what the best athletes of all time ended up doing once they stopped,” Roger Federer remarked in a recently published CNBC interview months before retiring.

“It’s not a simple one-way road and I think it’s acceptable to have numerous curves and we see that regularly with sportsmen.”

“Some of those folks maybe feel that after doing the same job for too long, it gets a bit monotone, always the same, and ‘I just need a change’,” the Swiss great said.

Federer then claimed that he regularly changed his training plan, strategy, and frequency to be creative. The eight-time Wimbledon and six-time US Open champion liked “difficult” challenges.

“I’ve tried to reinvent my trainings with my teams, where I train, when I train, how frequently I train, with whom I train, many many times to keep it fresh, because if you do it always in the same spot, (it gets) too dull,” the 41-year-old said. “I had to be exciting and challenge myself.”
The Swiss maestro added that when inspiration is gone, quitting sports is better.

“If you cannot discover that creative moment, walk away. I agree and understand athletes’ motivations “added. Roger Federer disapproves of retirement comebacks.
Roger Federer’s thoughts on retirement comebacks will quell any discussion about a surprise comeback. The 20-time Grand Slam champion stated that he will “never” return from retirement before retiring.

“I don’t like comebacks,” he said in the same interview.

“Never again. Squeeze that lemon and I’ll be done “said.
The Basel native has been active with art and fashion outside of tennis. He skied for the first time in 15 years, suggesting his knee problem may be improving.

Related articles

spot_img

Recent articles

spot_img
whatsapp icon